HBR/McKinsey M-Prize: Beyond Bureaucracy Challenge

Creating Inspired, Open & Free Organizations
Challenge Begins
First Round Deadline
Finalists Announced
Final Round Deadline

Winners announced!

We’re thrilled to introduce you to the winners of the Beyond Bureaucracy Challenge—the second phase of the HBR/McKinsey M-Prize for Management Innovation.



All the finalists

Here are the 14 finalists:


The Beyond Bureaucracy Challenge seeks to advance progress on making organizations genuinely fit for human beings—more inspiring, open, and free. We invite management innovators from around the world in every realm of endeavor to share the most progressive practices and disruptive ideas around: 

  • Making organizations more inspiring and engaging: What does it mean to build an organization in which everyone is aligned by a deeply-felt sense of purpose—and in which management assumptions and practices inspire and unleash imagination, initiative, and energy from every quarter?
  • Developing an outside-in orientation: What does it take to eliminate the gaps between “sense” and “respond,” to inject the voice of the customer and other relevant stakeholders into every decision, and to make the insights and observations of every individual—from edge to edge—matter?
  • Managing without managers: How do we reduce the performance drag of top-heavy management structures, replace “manager-management” with a more agile self- or peer-management, and replace rigid hierarchy with a vibrant social system?

Read more about the Beyond Bureaucracy Challenge in Gary Hamel and Colin Price’s post.

Submissions may draw on secondary source materials but should be based primarily on first-hand experience or an original idea. In every case, be sure to credit all those who contributed to your story or hack and provide citations to external reference material. 

The Beyond Bureaucracy Challenge will unfold in two stages: a preliminary submission phase (Deadline: December 23, 2011) and a final round for several finalists or finalist teams (Deadline: February 1, 2012). 

All entries will be judged by our panel of leading management thinkers and progressive practitioners, including: 

  • Colin Price, director of McKinsey & Company
  • Gary Hamel, cofounder, the MIX, author of The Future of Management
  • Tom Malone, professor, MIT Sloan School of Management, founding director of the MIT Center for Collective Intelligence
  • Eric Hellweg, Editor, Harvard Business Review Online
  • Polly LaBarre, editorial director, the MIX, author of Mavericks at Work
  • Jim Whitehurst, CEO of Red Hat
avijit-saha's picture
According to Michael Porter value is the chain of activities for a company that operates in a specific industry.
By Avijit Saha on March 15, 2011
bjarte-bogsnes's picture
At Statoil, we try to take reality seriously, not just a dynamic and unpredictable business environment, but also all the competent and responsible people in the company.
By Bjarte Bogsnes on November 28, 2011
pamela-weiss's picture
Every year companies spend billions of dollars on training and development, trying to help their people become more engaged, more innovative, and better leaders.
By Pamela Weiss on December 20, 2011
sanjay-mathur's picture
LiveOps is the only contact center (call center) leader focused on providing the full platform, applications, and talent in the cloud.  Consumers increasingly expect on-demand information and con
By Sanjay Mathur on December 9, 2011
henry-stewart's picture
A stressed out small businessman learns, the hard way, the importance of a work place where people are energized and motivated by working the way that works for them.
By Henry Stewart on July 21, 2010
jackie-yeaney's picture
Over the years I've participated in countless strategic planning projects, having spent several years as a management consultant and then as a member of the executive team of several public companies.
By Jackie Yeaney on November 10, 2011
cristian-mitreanu's picture
A new perspective on human nature, particularly on human needs, allows us to develop a dynamic model of the organization and an integrated top-down-bottom-up approach to management.
By Cristian Mitreanu on December 10, 2011
ricardo-semler's picture
Retire-a-Little is a program that gives employees the chance to buy back one day a week so they can spend that time on other activities that are important to them.
By Ricardo Semler on December 22, 2011
dan-bean's picture
To increase employee satisfaction, build trust and retain talent during a post-product cycle reorganization (reorg), the Microsoft Lync Test team offered its employees the freedom to choose what they
By Dan Bean on December 17, 2011